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(Global Edition) This morning: A commitment to denuclearization on the Korean peninsula. We’ll bring you the very latest from the historic summit between President Trump and North Korea’s Kim Jong-un, and explain the long-term political and economic implications. Afterward, President Trump said the issue of human rights in North Korea was discussed “relatively briefly”  at today’s summit.” But it’s a major issue for those who still live under the Kim regime.

You can't help but be a little underwhelmed.

The International House of Pancakes tweeted last week that it would be rebranding from IHOP to IHOb, with a promise to announce what it stood for a few days later.

It's been a year since Amazon acquired Whole Foods, and the company announced today Prime members in 10 more states are eligible for special deals at the store. With Amazon getting deeper into the grocery business, competitors have had to up their digital game ... and also improve delivery services. So what are they doing to compete?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

President Donald Trump backed out of a joint statement with the other six countries of the G-7 and lashed out at Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Twitter after Trudeau said Canada would push forward with retaliatory tariffs. A photo from the weekend kind of sums it all up: Trump's seated, arms crossed, eyebrows raised, while everyone else in the frame stands over him, including Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and German Chancellor Angela Merkel. It has a Trump-against-the-world feel to it, which is increasingly how Trump’s trade policies are shaping up.

Yocelyn’s 18-month-old has chickenpox. Her younger brother, who is 21, caught it too.

“I take the kids to the doctor because they have Medi-Cal, but we have to put up with it if we get sick,” she says.

Medi-Cal, California’s insurance for low-income families, covers children regardless of their immigration status but only provides coverage to undocumented adults in specific, often extraordinary, circumstances. Yocelyn’s brother has had a high fever for two days.

Sherry Ott has been all over the world. Borneo, Mongolia, Nepal — she writes about travel for a living.

But Antarctica was different.

It’s “the closest you can get to leaving this planet," Ott says. “This was the first place ever that I had been where clearly people were not in charge.”

At the US-Mexico border, migrants face an uncertain wait

Jun 11, 2018

After weeks of travel across Mexico by bus, freight train and foot, more than 150 migrants from Central America — part of a caravan that has gained international attention — confronted an uncertain wait at the US-Mexico border.

US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officials informed them that they did not have the capacity to process their requests to seek asylum in the United States. 

The photos on Naomi’s cell phone tell a gruesome story: shriveled and discolored skin on her now 8-year-old son’s left-hand.

She said he suffered third-degree burns when her former boyfriend threw a pot of hot oil at her, but it scalded her son instead. This happened back home in Honduras, when the boy was 4. The mother asked us not to use her real name in order to protect her identity while she seeks asylum.

"It's something I'm going to remember my whole life," Naomi said, adding that she feels guilty about her son's injuries but knows they are not her fault.

Those might sound the same, but in practice they're very, very different. Under President Obama, the Federal Communications Commission mandated that internet service providers treat all internet traffic the same. Today, those net neutrality rules were officially rolled back. We had Chairman Ajit Pai on to talk about what will change, how he measures success and what happens if his vision for an open internet doesn't work. Plus, it’s been a year since Amazon acquired Whole Foods. How has Amazon’s entry changed the grocery business?

Step into the City Hostel Berlin and you'd be forgiven for not noticing anything strange at all. The budget backpacker hotel near the Brandenburg Gate in former East Berlin has a spacious lobby, a big-screen TV, a pool table and room for hundreds of guests in its no-frills shared bunkbed rooms. Multilingual receptionists hand out rental towels and bartenders take orders for 12 kinds of beer at the hostel's busy bar. 

Today marks the official end of net neutrality rules. Put in place during the Obama administration, net neutrality rules prevented internet service providers from discriminating when it comes to content by slowing down the delivery of information for some content providers while speeding up others.

The U.S. government wants to borrow a fortune

Jun 11, 2018

(Markets Edition) With the FCC officially repealing net neutrality rules today, we'll look at what this could mean for your internet experience and the services you use. Afterwards, we'll explore why the U.S. government wants to borrow $200 billion from the markets, and then we'll discuss how the proposed merger between AT&T and Time Warner might shake out.

Most college students in the US are making plans for the summer. For some of the many Puerto Rican college students who came to the mainland to continue their studies after Hurricane Maria roared through the island last September, this time of the year brings a more complex question — whether to stay or go back home.

In Singapore, on the eve of the nuclear summit, they’re naming cocktails after leaders Kim and Trump. But a bit more seriously, the service sector for which Singapore is known — and one reason it was chosen — is kicking into high gear.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Today is the day when so-called net neutrality rules no longer apply to the internet. Last year, the Federal Communications Commission repealed the rules that had prevented internet providers from playing favorites, by, for instance, offering faster service to customers who pay more for it. What comes next?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

This weekend's G-7 summit: "The geopolitical equivalent of Trump firing Comey"

Jun 11, 2018

President Donald Trump refused to sign a joint statement at this weekend's G-7 summit after Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau complained of U.S. steel and aluminum tariffs at a news conference. 

Trudeau's remarks at the conference prompted Trump to lash out against him on Twitter. 

The city-state of Singapore is preparing to host a much-hyped summit between US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un on Tuesday.

Local speculation about where, exactly, the summit would be held was resolved this week. The two men, and possibly South Korean President Moon Jae-in, will hold talks at a swank hotel on Sentosa, an island resort just off the mainland that also features a water park, a Universal Studios theme park and a casino.  

Trump - Europe + North Korea = ?

Jun 11, 2018

(U.S. Edition) President Donald Trump is preparing to meet with North Korean President Kim Jong-Un in Singapore. We'll look at how much the area is spending to host the two leaders, and what both countries are hoping to get out of this meeting. Afterwards, we'll recap this weekend's G7 summit between various world leaders, which includes the U.S., Canada, the U.K. and Germany. According to Ian Bremmer, founder of political risk consultancy the Eurasia Group, this was the geopolitical equivalent of Trump firing Comey.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … The countdown begins for the summit between President Donald Trump and North Korea’s Kim Jong-un. We take you to Singapore, where the two leaders are meeting to see what both sides are hoping for, and how the island is preparing for the historic gathering. Then, despite Brexit and populist debates on immigration and jobs on the continent, encouraging news from EY, a global organization that provides advisory services, shows foreign direct investment in Europe is on the rise.

Why the end of net neutrality might look good ... at first

Jun 11, 2018

Pending some surprise moves by the House of Representatives, net neutrality will officially be repealed today. Those regulations prevented internet providers from blocking or interfering with or discriminating against the content they distribute. Now critics say cable and wireless broadband providers can block access to any site they want, charge more for services that compete with what they might offer — like Netflix or Hulu — and create paid fast lanes or even high-priced bundles that include some sites and exclude others. So what's likely to happen and when?

Pending some surprise moves by the House of Representatives, net neutrality will officially be repealed today. Those regulations prevented internet providers from blocking or interfering with or discriminating against the content they distribute. Now critics say cable and wireless broadband providers can block access to any site they want, charge more for services that compete with what they might offer — like Netflix or Hulu — and create paid fast lanes or even high-priced bundles that include some sites and exclude others. So what's likely to happen and when?

How U.S. trade policy has changed over 30 years

Jun 8, 2018

I'm pretty sure that this is a mutually acceptable statement of reality: Global trade is hard. There are competing interests, international geopolitics and economic pressures from every angle. But for at least the last 30 years, the trend has been toward more, not less, free trade. That makes where we are today with trade policy in this country all the more noteworthy, and why we made a timeline looking back at 30 years of U.S. trade policy.

1988

More than 90 percent of millennials eventually want to buy a house, according to the National Association of Home Builders. That can seem really far off for recent graduates, but there are a few steps to take right now that will make it easier in the future. But how do you pay off student loans, build credit, pay rent and save all at the same time? Delia Fernandez, a personal financial planner, sat down with Marketplace Weekend host Lizzie O'Leary to discuss.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

For millions of women worldwide, menstruation is seen as a mark of shame. Many are told not to discuss it in public, to hide their tampons and sanitary pads. The stigma is universal, rendering women and girls vulnerable to health problems and gender discrimination.

In her new book, "It's Only Blood: Shattering the Taboo of Menstruation," Swedish author Anna Dahlqvist traveled to Rwanda, Uganda, Bangladesh and India to find out the menstrual rules across the world.

On a recent Saturday in May, the atrium at Cleveland’s Metro Health Hospital was the site of a typical-looking job fair — people in suits shook hands and swapped business cards with company reps who sat behind tables adorned with mounds of branded freebies. Among the 24 companies, there were some big names including Starbucks, PNC Bank and Progressive Insurance.

Floating from table to table, leather portfolio in hand, was Nicolette Baldwin. After about 90 minutes, Baldwin had spoken with reps from nearly every company there.

Ronald Reagan said that 30 years ago in a weekly radio address about protectionism. For decades, the global economy has trended toward more free trade, not less. We're going to spend a few minutes today charting how we got here, from that speech through the next four administrations and up to our current moment, on the brink of a trade war. But first, we'll talk about the gathering of world leaders in Canada this weekend and America's place in it. Is it really the G-7? Or the G-6 plus one? We'll talk about it.

Graduating into the economy

Jun 8, 2018

We're diving into the economics of being a recent grad this week, from building credit, to finding the right job, to saving for a home (or simply paying the rent). Also, Marketplace staff lay out the graduation advice they wish they received but never got. And we look into just why "Pomp and Circumstance" is at every graduation. Plus, Linda Cardellini of "Freaks and Geeks" takes the Marketplace Quiz. (06/08/2017)

(Markets Edition) World leaders from countries like the U.S., Canada and the U.K. are set to meet this weekend as part of the annual G7 summit. On the heels of the event, we'll look at some of the maneuvering that business and trade groups are doing behind the scenes. Afterwards, we'll hear from Chris Low, chief economist at FTN Financial, about why economic trends in the U.S. — even positive ones — can have negative effects abroad. Then, we'll discuss how limited housing is a barrier for older Puerto Ricans in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. (06/08/2018)

Ahead of G-7 summit, lots of behind the scenes lobbying on trade

Jun 8, 2018

The G-7 Summit gets underway today (June 8) in Canada.  There will be plenty of pressure on President Trump at the various working sessions and dinners from US allies unhappy with the steel and aluminum tariffs, and NAFTA negotiations. But there’s also plenty of behind-the-scenes maneuvering by business and trade groups, both in Canada and the US. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Oil execs in meetings with pope

Jun 8, 2018

Pope Francis has called the world’s leading oil execs to the Vatican. Meetings are today and tomorrow, and will include leaders from companies like BP and ExxonMobil. They’re gathering to talk about how their businesses can tackle climate change.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

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