PRI - APM

News and features from American Public Media and Public Radio International.

Ways to Connect

Late last month, Abdul Aziz Adam posted a video on social media of a group of young men at a Manila airport. They were all glued to their cellphones, the blue light reflecting off of their faces.

"Last goodbye from Manila airport," Abdul Aziz said. "They will leave Manila to Los Angeles in couples of hours. Safe journey guys we will stay in touch. Big love from your brothers on Manus prison camps. Am sure the American people will give guys welcome at the airport."

Ruby Ibarra's memories of hip-hop date back to childhood. 

"I was 4 years old ... and remember being in my family's home and watching one of those Filipino variety shows," said Ibarra, referring to popular programs broadcast both in the Philippines and on networks catering to the Filipino community in the United States.

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro says his government will begin pre-selling a cryptocurrency today, called the "petro." It’s backed by the cash-strapped country’s oil reserves. Maduro is hoping to circumvent U.S.-led sanctions, attract investment and bring the country back from the brink of full-blown default. There’s significant skepticism about this strategy.

Click the audio player above for the full story.

A comic book hero offers a fresh vision of Africa

7 hours ago

Marvel Comics' blockbuster "Black Panther" has stirred up all sorts of debate.

Hana Baba and Leila Day, hosts of the podcast The Stoop, checked it out this weekend. They tell The World's Marco Werman they were pleasantly surprised, even though they were more than a little worried going in. 

02/20/2018: The black market for food carts

7 hours ago

(Markets Edition) Bond yields on the 10-year Treasury note are at their highest level in four years. On today's show, we'll look at whether their rise will continue. Afterwards, we'll talk about Venezuela's decision to pre-sell a cryptocurrency known as the "petro," which is backed by the country's oil reserves. Plus: We dive into the illegal black market for food carts in New York City. The number of legal street food permits issued by the city has barely increased since the '80s. 

It’s a mystery fit for a Cold War-era spy novel. In late 2016, officials with the US embassy in Havana started hearing strange noises that seemed to be directed right at their homes or hotel rooms.

Most called it a high-pitched sound. Some said it sounded like grinding metal, while others compared it to a kind of hum. Many said they felt pressure changes too, like the feeling of driving down a highway with only one car window open.

How Chinese media covers US gun violence

8 hours ago

Chinese state media often hypes American problems and foibles to redirect attention away from China’s poor human rights records. And yet, when it comes to American gun violence, it takes a measured tone.

What are apps like Venmo doing with your money?

8 hours ago

This is just one of the stories from our "I've Always Wondered" series, where we tackle all of your questions about the world of business, no matter how big or small. Ever wondered if recycling is worth it? Or how store brands stack up against name brands? What do you wonder?

I was fully booked during the Lunar New Year, with back-to-back patients in both Oakland and San Francisco, California.

I work with non- and limited-English speaking Vietnamese patients as a freelance medical interpreter at local hospitals. Outside the time dealing with doctors and nurses about medical conditions and diagnoses, I spend a good part of my time chatting with these patients.

The privately held owner of Safeway, Vons and other grocery brands is plunging deeper into the pharmacy business with a deal to buy Rite Aid, the nation's third-largest drugstore chain.

Albertsons Companies is offering either a share of its stock and $1.83 in cash or slightly more than a share for every 10 shares of Rite Aid. A deal value was not disclosed in a statement released Tuesday by the companies.

Shares of Rite Aid, which have shed more than half their value over the past year, jumped 40 cents, or 18.8 percent, in premarket trading after the deal was announced.

Selling food on the streets of New York City might seem like an easy way to make money, but it’s an almost impossible gig to land — legally. The number of legal street food vending permits issued in the city has barely increased since the 1980s.

02/20/2018: Splurging during Chinese New Year

10 hours ago

(U.S. Edition) The grocery chain Albertsons is planning to buy part of Rite Aid in a $24 billion deal. On today's show, we'll look at the tough supermarket landscape that big chains have to face these days. Afterwards, we'll discuss Walmart's venture into new apparel brands so that it can compete with Amazon, and then find out what some people in China are planning to splurge on this Chinese New Year.

For many, Chinese New Year is a time to splurge

10 hours ago

Chinese people are known as big savers, but the lunar new year, also known as the spring festival, is the one time of year when even farmers must splurge. Think of it as a combination of Thanksgiving and Christmas. The festival began on Friday and ends on Wednesday. Last year, Chinese people spent $122 billion during the weeklong holiday, and they’re expected to spend even more this year. What are Chinese people buying? Marketplace caught up with people at Shanghai’s Hongqiao Railway Station before they rushed back to their hometowns.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … The World Bank says pensions will consume Brazil’s entire federal budget by 2030 …but the country today shelved a vote on reform. What does it mean for a nation recovering from financial crisis, and will October elections bring light at the end of the tunnel? Then, a new cryptocurrency launches today, this time backed by Venezuelan oil. We’ll explain who’s investing — and who’s not. Afterward, to Spain where a key business witness will give evidence today in ongoing Spanish corruption investigations.

02/19/18: Life after a mass shooting

23 hours ago

A couple of weeks ago on this show, we told you about some of the funding and resources available for mass shooting victims to help with their short-term recovery. Today, we consider what life and work is like five, or even ten years after surviving a high-profile shooting. Two survivors of a mass shooting describe long term recovery. Also on today's show, we continue with our project called "Divided Decade," as we hear stories of how people's lives changed since the financial crisis ten years ago.

(Markets Edition) The U.S. Commerce Department has outlined a series of steep tariffs on steel and aluminum from some foreign countries, and China is not happy. We'll look at why the Trump administration is pushing for these tariffs and how China might retaliate if they go into effect. Plus: With the markets' wild swings a couple weeks ago, we look at the attitudes young investors have toward stocks. 

Even dogs need to have experience to get a job

Feb 19, 2018

After a year and a half of basic coursework, six months of professional training, and a final exam, Patch — a Labrador-golden retriever mix — was ready to become an assistance dog for Annette Ramirez.

Ramirez, a 53-year-old resident from Manhattan Beach, California, is a quadruple amputee who lost her limbs due to a medical mishap that occurred when she was undergoing a hysterectomy back in 2012.

The economics of presidential libraries

Feb 19, 2018

There’s more to Presidents Day than furniture and mattress sales. It’s a day when we recall the men who’ve held the country’s highest office. Thirteen presidents have libraries to jog the collective memory. We look at the economics of two presidential libraries.

Click the audio player above for the full story.

New tax law includes incentives for poor areas

Feb 19, 2018

A line item in the tax law creates a new Opportunity Zone program, with incentives to draw business to underdeveloped places. This strategy has been tried by former administrations, and state and local governments, with results that have often been disappointing.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

02/19/2018: Opportunities in the new tax law

Feb 19, 2018

(U.S. Edition) There's a section in the new tax law that aims to help chronically poor, underdeveloped areas in the U.S. The law creates an Opportunity Zones program, which gives incentives to draw businesses to these regions. But do they actually work? We'll dive into that question on today's show. Afterwards, we'll look at the group that President Trump's 2019 budget would most likely impact — if it were to go into effect. Plus: We discuss the economics of two presidential libraries: Ronald Reagan's in California and Herbert Hoover's in Iowa.

Tim Armstrong: People need to vote on net neutrality

Feb 19, 2018

Less than a year ago, Yahoo and AOL officially merged after AOL’s parent company, Verizon, bought Yahoo for more than $4 billion. Since then, former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer has moved on to an unannounced venture. AOL CEO Tim Armstrong has had the job of blending the two companies into a digital content behemoth named Oath, vying to challenge Facebook and Google for advertising revenue. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood spoke with Armstrong about how Oath fits in the digital media landscape at the Makers conference in Los Angeles earlier this month.

The Source Code: Tim Armstrong

Feb 19, 2018

Tim Armstrong worked at Google for years, then as the head of AOL. Now he's the CEO of Oath, the company that was created when Verizon bought Yahoo, and Yahoo and AOL merged. In this long cut of the interview, Armstrong talks about the future of digital content, as well as the awkwardness of sponsoring a women’s leadership conference that doesn’t have former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer at it.

No immigration bill as feds ink contract to monitor license plates

Feb 16, 2018

It was a busy week for immigration issues in Washington, DC — but it was also a busy week for immigration agents across the country who are stepping up arrests and finding new ways to track people.

This was supposed to be infrastructure week, remember? It turned out a little bit differently. Catherine Rampell of the Washington Post and Nela Richardson of Redfin joined us to talk about it. With the recent jobs report stirring fears of inflation, are we worrying too much about rising prices in the economy? Then: We're going to be borrowing a lot of money in this economy over the next eight to 10 years, yet White House advisers, including Council of Economic Advisers chair Kevin Hassett have basically said, "Deficits? Meh." We'll explain the fiscal flip-flop in the Republican Party.

What TV can teach the movie business about diversity

Feb 16, 2018

Tanya Saracho is the creator and showrunner of the Starz original scripted drama “Vida,” which centers around two Mexican-American sisters who return to east Los Angeles after their mother dies. While preparing to put the final touches to an episode with her editor, Saracho reflected on how all this was made possible, thanks to a meeting with Marta Fernandez, the senior vice president of Original Programming at the Starz network. “To have an executive who was Hispanic was amazing, ‘cause you don’t go into these meetings and see, you know, people like you,” she said.

Cherokee playwright Mary Kathryn Nagle is fighting for the rights of Native Americans both onstage and off. 

That emoji you just tweeted could determine the next ad you see

Feb 16, 2018

What do egglplant, fire and the number 100 all have in common? They're all emojis that have twisted and evolved in meaning.

As those little digital images change how we communicate, they've also transformed how advertisers track our interests.

Since 2016, Twitter has sold data of people’s emoji use to advertisers, allowing companies to send people specific ads based on the emojis they tweet.

What can AI learn from non-Western philosophies?

Feb 16, 2018

As autonomous and intelligent systems become more and more ubiquitous and sophisticated, developers and users face an important question: How do we ensure that when these technologies are in a position to make a decision, they make the right decision — the ethically right decision?

It's a complicated question. And there’s not one single right answer. 

But there is one thing that people who work in the budding field of AI ethics seem to agree on.

Yoon Ji-young lays down slabs of fatty pork belly that sizzle and crackle as they touch the burning hot grill atop her kitchen table. Four months into her first pregnancy, the 35-year-old says she’s been caught off guard by the “weird” desires she’s had for meaty dishes that she typically avoids.

“I’ve had strong cravings for junk food, like hamburgers and fried chicken,” she says. “I don’t even like fried chicken at all!” 

Do corporate wellness programs work?

Feb 16, 2018

Robert Granger stands on a thick, blue, padded mat and stares up a rock-climbing wall covered in rainbow-colored, hand-and-foot holds. It looks like like someone threw a handful of skittles at the wall and they stuck.

“It’s a really good place to unwind and think about something else,” he said, during breaks between ascents. “The nice thing is you have to use your mind, as well as body, doing this. It takes your mind off anything else.” 

Pages