College of Charleston

Coral polyps on Molasses Reef, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.
Brent Deuel [CC BY 2.0] via Flickr

People picture coral reefs as bursting with color and teeming with a variety of undersea life, which many are. But their number is shrinking, says College of Charleston biologist Phil Dustan, because they are hyper-sensitive to temperature changes, and climate change is warming the ocean to intolerable levels for many reefs. In his 40-plus years of studying reefs, Dustan said, the Florida Keys, for example, have probably lost 90 to 95 percent of their living coral reefs.

Known for his kinetic sculptures and light installations, Redl’s work easily catches the eyes.
Rainer Hosch

Erwin Redl investigates the process of “reverse engineering” by (re-)translating the abstract aesthetical language of virtual reality and 3D computer modeling into architectural environments by means of large-scale light installations. In his current show at the Halsey Institute of Charleston, his work displays strict methodologies which employ binary logic as well as tropes of minimalism to exuberant extremes.

A section of "The Space Between" by Alyson Shotz
Wellin Bentham/Halsey Gallery

  The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art presents an exhibition of recent work by Brooklyn-based sculptor, Alyson Shotz. With an artistic practice that examines the properties and interactions of light, gravity, mass, and space, Shotz bridges disciplines in her work, drawing on scientific methods, mathematical principles, and literature, among other diverse fields. Often employing nontraditional materials such as glass beads, linen thread, stainless-steel filaments, and welded aluminum to create large-scale abstract sculptures, Shotz expands upon conventional notions of sculptural space and form.