Walter Edgar's Journal

All Stations: Fri, 12-1 pm | News & Talk Stations: Sun, 4-5 pm

Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South. (A production of South Carolina Public Radio.)

Walter Edgar's Journal, Podcast Archive, May 2008 - August 2014

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DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed on Walter Edgar's Journal are not necessarily those of South Carolina Public Radio.

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The New South - Dr. James C. Cobb

Feb 9, 2015

- All Stations: Fri, Feb 13, 12:00 pm | News Stations: Sun, Feb 15, 4:00 pm -

Walter Edgar’s Journal  listeners have a front row seat for a public “Conversation about the South,” held in March of 2014 by the American History Book Club and Forum at the Upcountry History Museum – Furman University, in Greenville, SC. Long-time friends and colleagues, Professor James Cobb, who holds the B. Phinizy Spalding Professorship in History at the University of Georgia,  and Dr. Walter Edgar,  the Claude Henry Neuffer Professor of Southern Studies Emeritus at USC, have a wide-ranging conversation about the American South—past, present, and future.

Good Catch
Courtesy of Good Catch

  Bryan Tayara and Dr. John Mark Dean share a passion for sustainable, locally caught seafood. Tayara is owner of Our Local Catch, and Dr. Dean is a Distinguished Professor Emeritus in Science and Ocean Policy with the University of South Carolina's Marine Science Program. They talk with Dr. Edgar about the state of South Carolina’s crabbers, fishermen, shrimpers, and other suppliers.

Dr. Mark M. Smith
University of South Carolina

Dr. Mark M. Smith, of the University of South Carolina, returns to The Journal to talk about his book The Smell of Battle, the Taste of Siege: A Sensory History of the Civil War (Oxford University Press, 2014). No other book has looked at the Civil War through the prism of the five senses, or considered their impact on various groups of indviduals.

Bestselling author Ron Rash returns to Walter Edgar’s Journal to talk about his life and work. He’ll also tell Dr. Edgar about The Ron Rash Reader (USC Press, 2014), the 20th anniversary edition of The Night the New Jesus Fell to Earth (USC Press, 2014) as well as his collection entitled Something Rich and Strange (Harper Collins, 2014).

  The Palmetto Trust for Historic Preservation is a non-profit organization operating in South Carolina since 1990, dedicated to preserving and protecting the historic structures of our state. Executive Director Michael Bedenbaugh drops by our studio to talk with Walter Edgar about some recent success stories—including the preservation of Greenville’s Wilkins House, and the rehabilitation of the Frances Jones House as part of the Daufuskie Endangered Places Program.

- All Stations: Fri, Jan 09, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Jan 11, 4 pm -

James B. Edwards
Washington Times

  With the passing of former South Carolina Governor James B. Edwards, on December 26, 2014, Walter Edgar's Journal offers an encore of a conversation between Dr. Edgar and the Governor, which first aired in October of 2004.

Edwards was the first Republican Governor elected since Reconstruction.  Walter talks with him about his time in office…both on the state and federal levels. 

-Walter Edgar's Journal-   Greenville's downtown is widely recognized as one of the best in America. In Reimagining Greenville: Building the Best Downtown in America (The History Press, 2013), authors John Boyanoski and Mayor Knox White tell the story of the careful, deliberate efforts by city and community leaders who banded together to build something special from a decaying city center. Mayor White joins Walter Edgar to share some of this story.

- All Stations: Fri, Dec 26, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Dec 28, 4 pm -

  Novelist Sharyn McCrumb talks with Dr. Edgar about her new book Nora Bonesteel’s Christmas Past (2014, Abingdon Press) When someone buys the old Honeycutt house, Nora Bonesteel is glad to see some life brought back to the old mansion, even if it is by summer people. But when the new owners decide to stay in their summer home through Christmas, they find more than old memories in the walls.  Nora agrees to help sort things out, and is drawn into a time and place she never expected to revisit.

  A product of the industrialized New South, Eugene Healan Thomason (1895–1972) made the obligatory pilgrimage to New York to advance his art education and launch his career. Like so many other aspiring American artists, he understood that the city offered unparalleled personal and professional opportunities for a promising young painter in the early 1920s. Thomason returned to the South in the early 1930s, living first in Charlotte, North Carolina, before settling in a small Appalachian crossroads called Nebo.

  The story of Catholic Hill in the Colleton County town of Ritter serves as a metaphor for black Catholics in South Carolina. While the Catholic Hill experience is unique in many respects, it is emblematic of the struggle for the faith in the way that the people of Catholic Hill maintained their identity despite decades of hardship and neglect.” (Suzanne Krebsbach). Professor Allison McCletchie, of Claflin University, is leading a small team that is creating an ethnography of Catholic Hill. She joins Dr.

  In 1954, the U. S. Supreme Court made it's landmark ruling to end segregation in public schools in the case of Brown v. Board of Education. Fifty years on, Dr. Jon N. Hale, of the College of Charleston, and Dr. Millicent E. Brown, of Claflin University, join Dr. Edgar to talk about the road to school desegregation and civil rights in South Carolina.

Rep. James Clyburn drops by to talk with Walter Edgar about his life and career, and about writing his autobiography, Blessed Experiences: Genuinely Southern, Proudly Black.

 

- All Stations: Fri, Nov 21, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Nov 23, 4 pm -

Developing a Tourism Management Plan for Charleston

Nov 3, 2014

A city that has nearly five million visitors a year definitely needs a tourism management plan. And Charleston, SC, has one, which has been revised several times since its creation in 1978. Now, it's time to craft a totally new plan, and Historic Charleston Foundation's Katharine Robinson has been tasked with leading the committee responsible. She talks with Walter Edgar about the challenges and opportunities the committee faces in its work.

  - Walter Edgar's Journal - All Stations: Fri, Nov 7, 12 pm | New Stations: Sun, Nov 9, 4 pm -


Sir Robert Worcester
UNESCO UK

- All Stations: Fri, Oct 31, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Nov 2, 2014 -

The Magna Carta is a charter of liberties to which the English barons forced King John to give his assent in June 1215 at Runnymede in June of 1215. It is also considered by many to be a cornerstone of human rights to which the U. S. Constitution's Bill of Rights can trace its ancestry. Join Dr. Edgar to talk about the upcoming celebration of the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta are Sir Robert Worcester, Chair of the Magna Carta 800th Committee and the 2014 James Otis Lecturer at the South Carolina General Assembly, and Joel Collins, member of the South Carolina Chapter of the American Board of Trial Advocates.


Deb Richardson-Moore: The Weight of Mercy

Oct 20, 2014
Deb Richardson-Moore
Travis Dove

Deb Richardson-Moore, a middle-aged suburban mom and journalist was inspired to become a pastor after writing a story exploring God’s call in our lives. Seven years ago, a recent graduate of Erskine Theological Seminary, she took a position as pastor of the non-denominational Triune Mercy Center, an inner-city mission to the homeless in Greenville, S.C. “What I found there absolutely flattened me,” she says. It also inspired her. Today, she and a dedicated staff continue to build a worshiping community that focuses on drug rehab, jobs and housing for the homeless.

Dorothea Benton Frank
Courtesy of the author

    In The Hurricane Sisters (2014, Harper Collins), Dorothea Benton Frank again takes us deep into the heart of her magical South Carolina Lowcountry on a tumultuous journey filled with longings, disappointments, and, finally, a road toward happiness that is hard earned. There we meet three generations of women buried in secrets. The determined matriarch, Maisie Pringle, at eighty, is a force to be reckoned with because she will have the final word on everything, especially when she's dead wrong.

All Stations: Fri, Oct 3, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Oct 5, 4 pm 

Dr. Charles H. Lippy, the LeRoy A. Martin distinguished Professor of Religious Studies Emeritus at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and author of Religion in South Carolina will be giving a lecture in October at Ebenezer Lutheran Church, Columbia, on How the Civil War Transformed Religion in South Carolina . He stops by our studios to preview the topic with Dr. Edgar.

Pat Conroy and Family - The Death of Santini

Sep 23, 2014

 (Originally broadcast 04/18/14) - In his 2013 memoir, The Death of Santini: The Story of a Father and his Son,  author Pat Conroy admits that his father, Don, is the basis of abusive fighter pilot he created for the title role of his novel, The Great Santini, and that his mother, Peg, and his brothers and sisters have all served as models for characters in The Prince of Tides and his other novels. Now, for the first time, Pat gathers with four of his surviving siblings, Kathy, Tim, Mike, and Jim, to talk about the intersection of “real life” and Pat’s fiction, and what it was like to grow up with “the Great Santini” as a father.


(Originally broadcast 04/04/14) - Pat Conroy, author of The Water is WideThe Great SantiniThe Prince of TidesThe Death of Santini, joins Dr. Walter Edgar for an event celebrating the author’s life;  his work; and One Book, One Columbia’s 2014 selection, My Reading Life (Nan A. Talese, 2010). The conversation was recorded before an audience of over 2000, at Columbia’s Township Auditorium, on the evening of February 27, 2014.

Traditions and Change
USC McKissick Musuem

All Stations: Fri, 09/12/14, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, 09/14/14, 4 pmWalter Edgar's Journal: 

  Showcasing objects drawn from Native American Indian tribal museums, state museums, artist collections, private collections, as well as McKissick Museum’s own permanent collection, Traditions, Change, and Celebration: Native Artists of the Southeast considers Native American traditional arts as an expression of identity and heritage.

The Other Brother

Sep 5, 2014

- Walter Edgar's JournalThe Other Brother is a film about the ‘genetics’ of art and sibling estrangement. The subject is art but the story is universal. Two brothers, estranged since 1948, share an exceptional bond. One is an art-world insider, and one lived alone in a world of art.

Hunter Kennedy

Aug 29, 2014

(Originally Broadcast 02/28/14) - Begun as an open letter to strangers and fellow misfits, The Minus Times grew to become a hand-typed literary magazine that showcased the next generation of American fiction. Contributors include Sam Lipsyte, David Berman, Patrick DeWitt, and Wells Tower, with illustrations by David Eggers and Brad Neely as well as interviews with Dan Clowes, Barry Hannah, and a yet-to-be-famous Stephen Colbert.

Dr. Melissa Walker is the author of numerous books on the Civil War and is co-editor of Upcountry South Carolina Goes to War (USC Press, 2011). She talks with Dr. Walter Edgar about the role of “plain folk”—especially women—during the war.

This presentation was recorded at the University of South Carolina’s Capstone Conference Center, in Columbia, on January 28, and was part of the series “Conversations on the Civil War, 1864,” presented in January and February, 2014. The series is sponsored by the USC College of Arts and Sciences.

Retired Col. Ted Bell, his son, Ted Bell, Jr. and a film crew visited Okinawa, Japan, to revisit the site of a battle Bell lead during World War II. Here, filmmaker Wade Sellers films Bell at a memorial for Ernie Pyle at Peace Memorial.
Coal Powered Filmworks

(Broadcast August 23, 2013) - In April of 2013, an Army veteran from South Carolina returned to Okinawa, Japan, for the first time since he fought there in World War II. Retired Col. Ted Bell, 93, went back to the island after more than 67 years, this time with a film crew for South Carolina ETV, shooting part of the upcoming documentary, Man and Moment: Ted Bell and the Ridge.

Matt Walsh Matt Walsh (mwalsh@thestate.com)

(Broadcast November 02, 2012) - The Emmy-nominated documentary television series (produced in partnership by ETV and The State newspaper), South Carolinians in World War II, returns to ETV November 8th with its latest episode, A World War.  Joining Dr. Edgar to talk about this episode, and the war, are John Rainey, co-creator of the series; Wade Sellers, series director; and The State's Jeff Wilkinson, series producer.

J.C. Falkenberg III

(Broadcast 06/29/12) - Anderson native T. Moffatt Burris is a WWII veteran and concentration camp liberator who also participated in the invasions of Sicily and Italy. During Operation Market Garden in Holland, he led the amphibious assault across the Waal River made famous in the movie, A Bridge Too Far. Burriss is the subject of the upcoming ETV special Man and Moment: T. Moffatt Burriss and the Crossing. He joins Dr.

Matt Walsh Matt Walsh (mwalsh@thestate.com)

(Broadcast November 04, 2011) - About 184,000 South Carolinians served in World War II, and thousands more, who moved here after the war. ETV and The State newspaper partnered together to tell the stories of these veterans in their own words. The result is a new Emmy-nominated documentary series, South Carolinians in World War II.

(Broadcast May 20, 2011) - 184,000 South Carolinians served in World War II. South Carolinians in WWII is ETV's 3-part series that tells the story of some of these veterans. Series co-executive producer John Rainey and producer/director Jeff Wilkinson will join Dr. Edgar to talk tell some of the extraordinary stories of South Carolinians in World War II and talk about the series' second episode. A New Front covers the period from Italy's Monte Cassino to D-Day as well as the buildup in Britain, doctors and nurses, and the Charleston Navy Yard.

(Originally broadcast 03/06/2009) - On November 16th, 2008, a dream came true for Columbia restaurateur Bill Dukes as he and about 90 World War II veterans began a flight to Washington, DC, to see the WWII Memorial. For many of the veterans, a visit to the Memorial, dedicated in 2004, was something they would probably never have dreamed of, much less done. Honor Flight South Carolina is a non-profit organization dedicated to flying South Carolina WWII vets to see “their monument,” free of charge.

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