Marketplace

All Stations: Mon-Fri, 6:30 - 7:00 pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, Marketplace is an in-depth program that focuses on everything from the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.

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It’s tough to be in the processed food business these days. The abrupt departure of the Campbell’s CEO after a bad quarterly earnings report highlights how difficult it is for these companies to shift their identities, with consumers seeking foods they consider healthier. How are processed food companies responding?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

There’s been a little bit of confusion these past couple days on how trade talks with China are going. U.S. officials told CNN that China had offered to bump up purchases of American goods by $200 billion. Chinese officials said that's not true. The Trump administration believes that the trade deficit with China could be brought down if China were to buy that much more worth of American goods. It’s something the president is focused on even though most economists say he shouldn't be. 

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What happens when three big companies invest in an apology? Facebook, Uber and Wells Fargo have launched apology campaigns in the past several weeks. They’re all trying to regain the trust of their customers for scandals that have included data hacking, sexual harassment, and overcharging. But is an "I’m Sorry" ad effective?

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So, what's going on with trade again?

May 18, 2018

We're talking NAFTA. We're also talking tariffs. And China. And trade deficits. Leigh Gallagher from Fortune Magazine and Dion Rabouin from Yahoo Finance join us for the Weekly Wrap to talk about the unforeseen consequences of U.S. trade policy and the latest on the 10-year Treasury note. Also on today's show, we get into the Trump administration's attempt to get China to buy more goods from the United States. Trump wants to lower the trade deficit with Beijing, but is buying more American goods going to solve the problem? We also take a look at apology ads.

Recommended reading for recent college grads

May 18, 2018

(Markets Edition) The Trump administration plans to propose a new rule that would bar abortions at facilities that receive federal family planning funds. On today's show, we'll look at what this could mean for organizations like Planned Parenthood. Afterwards, amid news that the U.S. benchmark interest rate eased back a bit this morning, we'll discuss whether this is cause for alarm. And then to cap off today's show, we'll talk about the best personal finance books for recent college graduates. (05/18/2018)

Globalization has been touted as this inevitable, unstoppable force. But as the U.S., China and other major economies flex their muscles over trade, is this assumption all wrong?America has a long history of global trade and a varied one. Our economy has swung widely from protecting our very first industries with subsidies and imports to brokering global deals that open borders and lift trade barriers. It's not pure economics that dictates our trade relationships; it's politics and social context, too. Who’s gained from open borders and who's lost?

A new survey out this morning of mobility in the American workforce finds that one in four job applicants would move to a new city for a new job, a higher salary or better career opportunities. The online employment site Glassdoor found that younger workers and men were more likely than others to relocate to a new metro area, especially those in software engineering, developers and data scientists. And where are they moving to?

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Land accounts for 80 percent of farm assets according to the Department of Agriculture. So farmers are using their land as collateral to face low commodity prices, but the amount of production that farmers need to service their debt is rising. 

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It's tough out there for farmers

May 18, 2018

(U.S. Edition) The U.S. and China are hard at it to work out a trade agreement. One potential idea floating around: a $200 billion trade surplus package from Beijing. We'll chat with a former Treasury Department official about how big this offer is in the grand scheme of things. Afterwards, we'll look at the financial troubles many farms in the U.S. are facing. Many are using their land as collateral against loans to keep operating. (05/18/2018)

China drops U.S. trade probe

May 18, 2018

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... There are signs that the frosty trade relationship between the U.S. and China is thawing. Beijing has dropped a sanctions probe into American sorghum imports. But is this olive branch a sign that China will fulfill a promise to open its economy? We ask trade expert David Collins. Then, the bunting is out, the weather looks clear. Yes, it's finally here. Prince Harry will marry Meghan Markle this weekend at Windsor Castle. We speak to some of those involved in the celebrations.

The drama just keeps coming at CBS and Viacom

May 17, 2018

CBS lost today’s court battle for independence from its majority shareholder, National Amusements, Inc. But the saga between CBS and the parent company of Viacom is far from over, and it comes at a time when the entire media landscape is on the verge of being upended by mergers.  

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Labor shortage = labor shortage

May 17, 2018

The latest birth rate numbers are out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Americans, you are not being fruitful and multiplying. Last year saw the lowest number of births in 30 years. That dearth of babies has a lot of repercussions for the future — a smaller active labor force would mean less economic growth. 

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Royal wedding boosts the fashion industry

May 17, 2018

Britain’s tabloid press has been in a ferment over this weekend’s much-heralded royal wedding. What the journalists initially dubbed the “Markle Sparkle,” they then attacked as the “Markle Debacle” following the revelation that the bride’s father, Thomas Markle, will not be walking her down the aisle, citing health problems. Doubts about his attendance first surfaced after it was alleged that he was paid for staging photos with journalists. If true, that would break an unwritten rule that members of the royal family must not profit financially from their association with the monarchy.

Ask a Manager: Navigating an internship

May 17, 2018

Summer is rapidly approaching, and with it, a slew of seasonal jobs and internships. Internships have become a rite of passage for many young professionals on the verge of entering the workforce and a gateway to a career.

But internships can also be problematic — they are often unpaid, or underpaid. Those who take internships forgo other work opportunities in favor of experience, a choice many can't afford to make.

The median household income in Texas oil country – the Permian Basin - is consistently among the highest in the country at almost $70,000. But not everyone is making that kind of money. Ask people in Midland about the underserved and homeless population, they’ll almost immediately talk about the different boards they’re on and the work their church does to help the less fortunate. And almost everyone agrees they don’t want the state taking their money to help do something they’re perfectly capable of and willing to do. But is it enough? 

This week, retailers have been releasing their earnings and doing better than many expected. Today, we’ll get Nordstrom earnings after the bell. Facing the ongoing threat from e-commerce, the company is digging in to the in store experience, especially for one particular group of consumers.

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The problems with a declining birth rate

May 17, 2018

(Markets Edition) The birthrate in America just keeps going down. We talked to Diane Swonk, the chief economist at the accounting and consulting firm Grant Thornton, about the economic troubles this will cause for the U.S. down the road. Afterwards, we'll look at how Britain is placing limits on some fixed-odds betting machines, and then discuss how the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision to OK legal sports will impact New Jersey. (05/17/2018)

The FDA plans to unveil a website today naming pharmaceutical companies that have blocked the development of generic drugs by failing to provide samples to competitors. This public posting is part of FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb's larger crackdown to, as he says, “end the shenanigans” by brand name drug companies.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

How millennials feel about capitalism and socialism

May 17, 2018

(U.S. Edition) The Food and Drug administration is planning to unveil a new website today, naming pharmaceutical companies that have blocked the development of generic drugs. We'll look at whether public shaming could change how drug makers behave. Afterwards, we'll discuss the reasons behind America's declining birth rate amid news that it's hit a 30-year-low. Plus: We talk to University of Chicago political science professor Cathy Cohen about the latest survey from GenForward, an ongoing study that looks at how millennials think at major societal issues.

For many millennials, socialism isn't the "dirty word" it once was

May 17, 2018

Millennials are living through a massive upheaval in our economy. From the aftereffects of the Great Recession to the displacement of workers due to automation, they're inheriting conditions vastly differ than previous generations.

So which economic systems do they think will work? How well do they think the government is doing in tackling our country's economic issues? 

U.K. targets "crack cocaine" gambling machines

May 17, 2018

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... They’re known as the “crack cocaine” of the betting world. Now, the U.K. government is slashing the maximum stake on electronic slot machines in a move it claims will protect vulnerable players. We'll look at what difference this will make. Then, U.S. grocery giant Kroger is buying a stake in Britain's Ocado. Bryan Roberts at TCC Global explains why the American retailer is hoping to take advantage of British technology.

After years of struggling through the brick-and-mortar apocalypse, Macy’s posted numbers today that blew past expectations. Sales for the first few months of the  year were up almost 4 percent over the same time last year. And the retailer improved its outlook for the year ahead by a pretty big margin. Investors were surprised, to say the least. And so was Macy’s.   

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Tomorrow is supposed to be the final deadline  — per House Speaker Paul Ryan — for trade negotiators to agree to a revised North American Free Trade Agreement. That is if they want this Congress to vote on NAFTA before the end of the year. There's been some push back there — others counting calendar days differently and saying there's a bit more time still. But amidst this deadline pressure, there's also been talk that the countries narrow their focus and try to tackle fewer issues.

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It’s primary season, with voting in Idaho, Nebraska, Oregon and Pennsylvania on Tuesday and dozens more elections in the coming week to determine who will land on the ballot for November’s midterm elections. 

Ali Ashkanani started studying English in elementary school in Kuwait, more than 6,000 miles away from where he now lives in Philadelphia.

He said he realized quickly that the English pronunciation he learned in Kuwait wasn't going to cut it, if he was going to pursues a degree in industrial engineering in the United States.

Take the common phrase — “bottle of water.”

(Markets Edition) The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note is still hovering above 3 percent. We'll talk with Susan Schmidt, senior portfolio manager at Westwood Holdings Group, about what this means for the U.S. economy, and whether China is holding too much of our debt. Afterwards, we'll chat with Boston College finance professor Richard McGowan about the legalization of sports gambling and its consequences for fantasy sports. (05/16/2018)

 

Macy’s: Rewards for all, no card needed

May 16, 2018

Struggling to keep the customers coming to stores, Macy’s is expanding special deals by offering rewards and discounts to all shoppers, not just its credit card holders.

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This week, the Seattle City Council unanimously voted in what’s commonly known as a “headcount tax.” Businesses that bring in more than $20 million in annual revenue will have to pay a $275 tax for each of their full-time employees. It’s a lower fee than what many were hoping for, but there are still plenty of concerns.

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A caution about workplace friendships

May 16, 2018

(U.S. Edition) Kellogg is the latest U.S. company to pull out of Venezuela amid soaring inflation and dwindling access to raw materials. We'll take a  look at how the country's president, Nicholas Maduro, is reacting to the news. Afterwards, we'll discuss Seattle's decision to approve a "headcount tax," which would require businesses that bring in more than $20 million in revenue a year to pay $275 for each full-time employee. Plus: We dive into some of the downsides workplace friendships with Nancy Rothbard, co-author of a new paper called "Friends Without Benefits." (05/16/2018)

What's the downside of making friends at work?

May 16, 2018

Workplace friendships could have negative effects for a company, especially in the age of social media, according to a study published in The Academy of Management Review.

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