Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

A federal judge in California has ruled that a confidential messaging app must release the identity of a user who is accused of helping plan violence at a white nationalist rally last year in Charlottesville, Va.

The unnamed woman is one of dozens of people accused of using the gamer chat app Discord to organize violence at that event. Lawyers representing victims of that violence have subpoenaed the app for more information on those conversations. But the woman, known as "Jane Doe" in the court case and "kristall.night" on the app, attempted to quash the subpoena.

Law enforcement officers in Union County, N.C., are searching for the teenager who carried out the armed robbery of a child's lemonade stand over the weekend.

The 9-year-old was robbed around 3 p.m. on Saturday, in the town of Monroe.

"The suspect allegedly stuck a black handgun to the boy's stomach, demanded money and fled the scene on foot," the Union County Sheriff's Office said in a statement.

Public information officer Tony Underwood tells NPR that the robber got away with $17.

Movie theater subscription service MoviePass will not be raising prices, as it had announced last week, but will instead be capping the number of times that subscribers can visit movie theaters.

For $9.95 per month, MoviePass subscribers used to be able to see a movie in theaters every day, if they so chose. Beginning on August 15, the service will instead provide three movies per month.

Updated at 11:55 p.m. ET

As firefighters work to contain a deadly wildfire in Northern California, now the largest in the state's history, another fire is rapidly expanding, threatening new communities and prompting fresh evacuations.

As the sun rose over Idaho on Friday, residents of suburban West Boise awoke to find some noisy new neighbors horning in on their yards: goats. A teeming host of hungry, grunting goats.

Local reporter Joe Parris got the scoop, tweeting a photo of the horde on hooves. They were unsupervised — no handlers, no herding dogs, not even a nanny.

"Updates to follow," he promised.

Updated at 2:22 p.m. ET

More than a hundred households have been evacuated from their homes in Lynchburg, Va., after heavy rains amid concerns that an aging dam might fail and unleash dangerous floodwaters.

Video posted by the city overnight showed water flowing over the dam and into Blackwater Creek.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

China has announced a plan to impose new tariffs on $60 billion of American goods, in retaliation for the latest tariff threats from the Trump administration.

Earlier this week, the White House said it was considering boosting tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods, raising those tariffs to 25 percent from 10 percent. That particular set of tariffs has not yet taken effect.

For decades, the Catholic Church has grappled with sexual abuse of children by priests — through quiet reassignments and headline-grabbing scandals, internal investigations and public criminal charges, simmering controversies and settlements with survivors.

Now, some parishes in Pennsylvania are reckoning with the problem through an unusual dose of transparency.

Updated at 12:12 p.m. ET

Three of Sweden's crown jewels, dating back to the 17th century, were stolen Tuesday in a brazen daylight heist.

Two crowns and an orb are missing, and the thieves are still at large. They fled from the church first by bicycle and then by motorboat. An international search is underway.

Updated at 1:20 p.m. ET Wednesday

The two American bicyclists killed in an attack in Tajikistan on Sunday were a couple from Washington, D.C., who quit their jobs to bike around the globe.

The couple, Jay Austin and Lauren Geoghegan, both 29, had been on the road for just over a year.

On their blog, they described the kindness and generosity of strangers around the world as they biked through Africa, Europe and central Asia.

Although President Trump said Monday that he would be willing to meet with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani at "any time," it looks like that meeting won't be happening any time soon — multiple Iranian officials have played down the possibility of a sit-down, without ruling it out entirely.

The former head of human resources at the Federal Emergency Management Agency has been accused of sexual harassment and other misconduct — including allegations that he hired women at FEMA as potential sexual partners for friends of his, according to The Washington Post.

FEMA Administrator Brock Long released a statement acknowledging "deeply disturbing" allegations of sexual misconduct by a former head of personnel at FEMA, without naming the individual.

Updated at 4:03 p.m. ET

Some Americans have been trailed and closely monitored by undercover air marshals as they traveled on U.S. flights, as part of a previously undisclosed Transportation Security Administration program called Quiet Skies. The marshals take notes on the targeted traveler's behavior, sending detailed reports to the TSA.

The United Kingdom is counting its butterflies today — and will keep going for the next three weeks.

The ninth annual Big Butterfly Campaign kicks off today, with a big boost from a legendary voice.

"I did it in my garden," Sir David Attenborough intoned. "Where are you going to do yours?"

The ask is simple: Anybody in the U.K. can download an app or print out a chart that shows pictures of common butterflies.

Updated at 12:30 a.m. ET on Friday

The National Football League and the NFL Players Association have agreed to suspend enforcement of new rules requiring players to stand during the pregame rendition of the national anthem, after a report that the Miami Dolphins would fine and/or suspend players for up to four games for violating the policy.

Counting cats, much like herding them, is a complicated proposition.

But a coalition of groups in Washington, D.C., is giving it a shot.

PetSmart Charities, the Humane Society, the Humane Rescue Alliance and the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute are collaborating on a project called the D.C. Cat Count, which aims to create a more accurate estimate of the city's entire cat population — both feral cats and pet cats.

California will be staying in one piece, at least for now, after the state's supreme court ruled that a proposal to divide California into three cannot be placed on the ballot in November.

Ethiopia's "bird of peace" has landed.

After two decades of bloody conflict, Ethiopia and Eritrea have been repairing their relationship with remarkable speed following a peace deal reached last week. On Wednesday, a new milestone was marked — the first commercial flight between the neighboring countries in 20 years.

Updated at 9:15 a.m. ET

The European Commission has fined Google $5 billion for violating the European Union's antitrust rules — specifically, by forcing manufacturers of Android phones to install the Google search app and the Chrome Web browser.

"Google has used Android as a vehicle to cement the dominance of its search engine," Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said in a statement. "These practices have denied rivals the chance to innovate and compete on the merits."

Lizzie Purbrick, a former champion equestrian, admitted in a British court that she scrawled rude messages inside her lover's house in pig's blood as revenge for an affair.

She said she discovered her partner, conservative member of Parliament David Prior, was sleeping with another woman. So in May, she let herself into his South London home, armed with the blood.

Purbrick turned herself into police quickly, and confessed to the crime in court on Tuesday. She called the blood-spraying act "cathartic."

She has been sentenced to 120 hours of community service.

Updated at 5:40 p.m. ET

The company that owns the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas has asked federal courts to declare that it is not liable in the October 2017 mass shooting carried out by a gunman staying at Mandalay Bay.

Stephen Paddock stayed at the resort for several days before he opened fire on the Route 91 Harvest music festival. Aiming from the windows of his 32nd-floor hotel room, he killed 58 people and injured hundreds.

Half a million roses have been placed in the shape of a flat-topped pyramid in Tabacundo, Ecuador, in an attempt to enter the Guinness Book of World Records.

Currently, the world record for largest flower arrangement is held by the Dubai Miracle Garden in United Arab Emirates, which created a life-size sculpture of a Airbus A380 in 2016.

More than three years after a white supremacist opened fire in Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C., killing nine worshippers, an architect has revealed a design for a memorial at the church.

The design by Michael Arad features two large and curving stone benches, a gentle fountain and a garden space "dedicated to life and resiliency."

Arad, along with landscape architect Peter Walker, designed the Sept. 11 memorial in New York City after he won an international design competition.

A drone flight and a lingering dry spell have exposed a previously unknown monument in Ireland's Boyne Valley, forgotten for thousands of years and long covered by crops — which, struggling to cope with a lengthy drought, finally revealed the ancient footprint.

Alone in a Border Patrol detention facility, separated from her mother, 6-year-old Alison Jimena Valencia Madrid knew what she had to do.

She had to persuade somebody — anybody — to call her aunt. She knew the number by heart, she said, rattling it off as other migrant children around her cried. Her pleas were captured on audio covertly recorded inside the facility, and published on June 18 by a journalist at ProPublica.

Now, a month and two days after their separation, Jimena and her mother have been reunited at an airport in Houston.

Nearly 63 years after the brutal, racist killing of Emmett Till, a black 14-year-old from Chicago who was visiting family in Mississippi, the Justice Department has reopened the investigation into the killing.

The department says it has received "new information" in the case but cannot provide any details about the reactivated investigation.

The reopening was announced in an annual report to Congress in March and widely reported on Thursday.

Sixteen-year-old drivers get in a fair number of car crashes.

But most of them don't look like this.

A young man in southwestern Minnesota found himself in a pickle when he drove straight into a gaping chasm in the road before him. As seen in video published by the local sheriff's office, the accident left the car sticking into the air, nearly vertical.

Reality Winner, the former NSA contractor accused of leaking classified documents to a news site last summer, has accepted a bargain with prosecutors and pleaded guilty in federal court.

Winner, 26, was charged with violating the Espionage Act. She was accused of leaking documents that described Russian efforts to penetrate American election systems.

Her plea bargain calls for her to serve 5 years and 3 months in prison, with 3 years' supervised release, Georgia Public Broadcasting's Stephen Fowler reports. The deal still needs to be approved by a judge.

Remember the Ecce Homo, the notorious, well-intentioned, poorly realized "restoration" of a fresco of Jesus in the town of Borja?

A group of craftsmen in Estella, Spain, seems to have missed out on the cautionary tale.

"It has happened again," El País solemnly intoned.

Brendan Dassey, who was found guilty of assisting in a 2005 murder in Wisconsin on the basis of a confession that his lawyers say was coerced, will not be getting his case reconsidered by the Supreme Court.

Dassey's case was featured in a Netflix documentary called Making a Murderer, which cast doubt on the validity of his conviction, as well as that of his uncle, Steven Avery.

Over the past two years, a lower court and a three-judge panel of an appeals court both found that Dassey's confession was involuntary and that he should be released.

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