WEPR-FM Transmission Interruption

Nov 5, 2017

Monday, November 13, through Friday, November 17, 2017, between the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm,  WEPR-FM, Greenville, 90.1, will be periodically off the air because of work being done on the transmission tower.

Streaming will not be affected. We appreciate your patience.

It was an unusually busy week on Capitol Hill.

The House passed the tax bill, largely along party lines. Now it's on to the Senate, where Republicans are tacking on a rollback of the Obamacare individual mandate.

For all the negative headlines that 2017 have generated, Republicans are on the cusp of accomplishing two major policy goals that have eluded them for decades, at the same time.

The Senate could soon approve oil drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge with its bill to overhaul the nation's tax code.

You are in a foreign country. And things are certainly looking a bit foreign.

Do you sit or squat? Can you toss toilet paper down the bowl or hole?

Let the signs guide you.

That is, if you can understand them.

Doug Lansky, author of the Signspotting series of books, knows how toilet etiquette signs can be mysterious, misleading and hilarious. His books include all types of funny warning and advice signs, but the topic of toilets is especially popular.

Two dozen third-graders wiggle in their seats. Their attention is on their teacher — up front. He has a question for them: How many know about condoms? About half of the class raise their hands. The students are fixed on his talk — a lesson on sexual education and gender equality.

Everyone inside the classroom in Kaohsiung, Taiwan's second largest city, is captivated with this lesson. It's the people farther away — across the small island nation — that are not happy about this.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Davis Sander of South Pleasantburg Nursery came to the show recently with a collection of viburnums. One in particular caught my eye as it has great value for wildlife, especially pollinators and birds. Viburnum dentatum, arrowwood viburnum, gets its common name according to Michael Dirr because the very strong root shoots, this plant can sucker and spread, were used for the shafts of arrows by native Americans.

The three UCLA basketball players President Trump helped spring from China this week looked shamefaced when they told reporters in Los Angeles they were guilty of shoplifting sunglasses in China. They added they were grateful to President Trump for raising their case with President Xi Jinping. Mr.

Updated on Saturday, Nov. 18, at 9:45 a.m., ET.

Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri, who resigned his position earlier this month amid political tensions with Saudi Arabia, says he is returning to his country after a meeting with French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris on Saturday.

Hariri told reporters he would clarify his political position upon returning to Lebanon for Independence Day celebrations, the Associated Press reported.

"As you know I have resigned and we will speak about this matter there (Lebanon)," Hariri said.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

And now a goodbye to the Warped Tour.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THE ROCK SHOW")

BLINK-182: (Singing) I couldn't wait for the summer and the Warped Tour. I remember it's the first time that I saw her there.

The head of Puerto Rico's power authority stepped down Friday amid controversy over his handling of a system that still can't deliver electricity to that island two months after Hurricane Maria destroyed the power grid.

Ricardo Ramos, executive director of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, or PREPA, resigned as he was unable to shake off questions about a $300 million contract that he had awarded to Whitefish, a small Montana-based energy firm, that was supposed to restore power on the island.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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South Carolina Military and Veterans

Stories about South Carolina veterans, the history of the conflicts in which they served, and those on the home front.

Recovery

Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.

Piano Jazz

Jazz legend Marian McPartland hosted Piano Jazz for over 30 years. The show continues showcasing the top musicians of all time with broadcasts and podcasts from the archives.

South Carolina Public Radio News

'Gator on Durham Creek, Berkeley County
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

Ron Russell has been catching alligators in the Lowcountry for nearly 30 years.  Each fall, people hire him as a guide for the state's public hunt.  But this year, he says gators, especially the big ones, were harder to find.

"We've harvested the heck out of them with all three programs the last 12 years," said Russell.  "I think it's going to start showing up we can't maintain this every year without it actually hurting the population dramatically.  I've already seen the decrease in population just in this area."

Mayor Steve Benjamin of Columbia commemorated his city's commitment to the Sierra Club's Ready for 100 Campaign in May.
Thelisha Eaddy/SC Public Radio.

Since President Trump announced the U.S. would exit the Paris Climate Agreement back in June, redoubled support for the agreement has come from the local level, with mayors from around the nation pledging their cities' support for the Agreement.

This is the way the new Real I.D.s will look when they are available to South Carolinians between the end of the first quarter of 2018 and Oct. 1, 2020.  The gold star in the upper right corner denotes the card as a Real I.D.
Photo courtesy S.C. Dept. of Motor Vehicles

The Real I.D. Act of 2005 was passed by Congress in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks to standardize government-issued identifications, like drivers' licenses, for security purposes.  Beginning in 2018, South Carolinians will be able to get a Real I.D., which they must have by Oct. 1, 2020, in order to do activities such as board a commercial airplane, visit a secure federal building or a military post. 

More SC Public Radio News
From books to barbecue, from current events to colonial history, Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South.
On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …
How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.

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