Jazz Night in America

Marian McPartland: A Centennial Celebration

No jazz musician has ever been heard more on public radio than the late Marian McPartland, the host of NPR's Piano Jazz for more than 40 years. But for all her ubiquity, how well did we really know he

Between the autumns of 2015 and 2017, 47 of South Carolina’s state parks experienced temporary closures due to damages sustained during severe weather events, including the Floods of 2015, Hurricane Matthew, Hurricane Irma and the Pinnacle Mountain Wildfire at Table Rock State Park. February marked an important milestone for the state’s parks: for the first time since the fall of 2015, every affected park was reopened.

Remember that skeleton hanging in the front of your biology — or art — classroom?

It's possible those bones are not plastic, but actual human remains. A lot of classroom skeletons, in high schools, universities and medical schools, are real.

Democrats got their shot at Education Secretary Betsy DeVos today as she testified before a House committee about her department's proposed budget.

The hearing followed widespread criticism of DeVos for lackluster performances on 60 Minutes and the Today show earlier this month. She remains one of the most unpopular members of President Trump's cabinet and continues to anger Democrats over many issues.

With recent backlash surrounding analytics firm Cambridge Analytica's access to and alleged misuse of massive amounts of Facebook user data, NPR wants to hear from social media users.

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Survivors of mass shootings are facing relentless harassment and renewed trauma from conspiracy theorists who claim the attacks were staged by the federal government.

From Sandy Hook to Parkland, the idea that the victims are hired actors who stage tragedies in order to achieve sinister political goals has drifted from dark corners of right-wing media into the mainstream.

North Korea has earned a reputation as a country that knows how to play a weak diplomatic hand well. Or at least, it is known to have confounded U.S. negotiators and persisted in its nuclear drive by hook or by crook, despite both its relative weakness and repeated American efforts to halt and reverse North Korea's nuclear development.

What lessons should the U.S. government bear in mind if President Trump indeed ends up sitting across the negotiating table from Kim Jong Un, and what should Trump do differently?

Saudi Crown Prince Visits The White House

2 hours ago

President Trump and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman meet at the White House on Tuesday. Among the topics of discussion will be Saudi investment in the United States, U.S. investment in Saudi Arabia, the war in Yemen and the Saudi relationship with Russia.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Ali Al-Ahmed (@AliAlAhmed_en) from the Institute for Gulf Affairs.

Editor’s Note: This segment discusses suicide, and contains audio that some listeners may find disturbing or offensive.

José López doesn't have a deed for the little house at the edge of a dairy farm where he was raised and still lives — only the stories his grandfather told him about how the house came to be.

It began with an agreement between gentlemen 39 years ago. His grandfather, a foreman on the farm, needed a house for his recently divorced daughter, López's mother. So he asked the farm's owner if he could have a little corner of the sprawling estate to build her one.

"My grandfather worked on the farm for 44 years," López said, "and his boss was a good man. He said yes."


News and Features from APM and PRI

It seems that not even 100 million pierced ears were enough to keep Claire’s out of debt. The jewelry chain filed for bankruptcy earlier this week on March 19. But don’t despair just yet — the company is not shutting down all of its stores. According to the New York Times, Claire’s plans to close fewer than 200 stores over the next four years, going from 1,570 stores in 2017 to 1,400 stores in 2022.

Putin wins, surprising no one, but voter turnout rose

4 hours ago

The result came, of course, as no surprise.

Russian President Vladimir Putin overwhelmed his opponents in his country’s elections, taking in just more than three-quarters of the vote to extend his power through 2024.  His closest challenger, Communist millionaire Pavel Grudinin, came in a distant second with 11 percent of cast ballots.  A ultra-nationalist came in third. Pro-Western candidates barely cleared the 1 percent mark. 

Tamara Kruglova, a pensioner who voted in central Moscow, argued support for the Russian leader was simply the natural order of things.

(Markets Edition) Cambridge Analytica's decision to harvest the info of millions of Facebook users has jittered the markets, but investors may be worried about more than the story at hand. Max Wolffe, chief economist at the Phoenix Group, joined us to explain why. Afterwards, we'll look at what the interest rate forecast for the year looks like prior to the Fed's meeting today, and then discuss the latest updates with the Takata airbag recall. 

In the depths of Bangladesh’s Balukhali refugee camp, a large group of Rohingya men gathers atop a windy hill under the late afternoon sun. They’ve just been dropped off with their families by UNHCR — the UN’s refugee agency — as part of ongoing efforts to bring more of the 1 million-plus Rohingya refugees Bangladesh says are in the country into one massive settlement.

A U.S. Senate subcommittee on commerce is scheduled to hold a hearing Tuesday on the status of  the long-running Takata airbag recall. The government’s traffic safety agency says it’s the largest and most complex safety recall in U.S. history. Where does the recall stand?

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Narrative captures stories of South Carolina through interviews and personal conversations.

Piano Jazz

Jazz legend Marian McPartland hosted Piano Jazz for over 30 years. The show continues showcasing the top musicians of all time with broadcasts and podcasts from the archives.

South Carolina Lede

Join host Gavin Jackson each week as we break down state political news and go inside the legislative happenings that could affect you, your family, and your pocketbook.

Every musician has to start somewhere!

Start by entering the @nprmusic #TinyDeskContest between Feb 20 - Mar 25.

From books to barbecue, from current events to colonial history, Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South.
On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

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South Carolina Military and Veterans

Stories about South Carolina veterans, the history of the conflicts in which they served, and those on the home front.

How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.


Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.